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civicreflex_poster

PERFORMANCY FORUM: CIVIC REFLEX is a collective performance/social art project involving: 1) the formation of a self-reflexive collective of 20 artists/groups 2) a series of 5 public forum events and 3) an online blog substantiating and framing “civic” “civil” and “reflexive” performance practices and performative theoretics. PERFORMANCY FORUM: REFLEJO CÍVICO es un colectivo de arte social y performance  que consiste en: 1) la creación de un colectivo de 20 artistas/grupos que se comporte de manera auto-reflexiva 2) una serie de 5 eventos/foros abiertos al público 3) un blog online dedicado a proveer contexto y enmarcar teóricamente prácticas de arte performático, civil, cívico y auto-reflexivo.

http://reflejocivico.civicreflex.us/

The 20 artists/groups will meet on each of the five Saturdays for collective forum discussion and interaction, followed by performances/presentations/situations on each date starting at 8pm, FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

April 21, 8pm. Public performances/presentations by: Diane Dwyer, Benjamin Lundberg Torres Sánchez, Rina Espiritu

May 26, 8pm. Public performances/presentations by: Pei-Ling Ho, Daniel Gonzalez, Nana Ama Bentsi-Enchill

September 29, 8pm. Public performances/presentations by: Aditi Natasha Kini and Amin Husain, Leopold Krist, Megan Livingston, Feminist Art Group (F.A.G.)

October 20, 8pm. Public performances/presentations by:  Amelia Marzec, Samantha CC, Sierra Ortega, Verónica Peña

November 10, 8pm. Public performances/presentations by: Ada Pinkston, Lorene Bouboushian, Arantxa Araujo, Helen Yung, David Ian Bellows/Griess

CIVIC REFLEX/REFLEJO CIVICO is sponsored, in part, by the Greater New York Arts Development Fund of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, administered by Brooklyn Arts Council (BAC). The project is administered/conceived by Esther Neff, participant selections were made by the PERFORMANCY FORUM committee via an Open Call.


Please visit PPL on Facebook and the PPL Website for Event information

Rae Goodwin: 'calling ancestry' Artpotheek, Brussels, 2014. Photo by Eva Campos Suarez

IMAGE: Rae Goodwin: ‘calling ancestry’ Artpotheek, Brussels, 2014. Photo by Eva Campos Suarez. DON’T MISS RAE’S PERFORMANCE ON VALENTINE’S DAY, along with performances by Nabeela Vega, Tif Robinette, Sylva Dean and Me, and Claribel Jolie Pichardo


January marks the 5-year anniversary of PERFORMANCY FORUM, a platform for performance art and interdisciplinary practices!

Bad weather (or human fear of it, at least) has foiled some of PPL’s January 2015 operations, but this February we have an intense number of public situations going on! Click HERE to see the schedule, join our mailing list HERE, or “Like” the space’s Facebook Page to get invited there and stay updated on events coming up!

We also have a framing text and report to share HERE
and some revised guidelines for proposals and space usage HERE (and posted below)

GENERAL OPEN CALL for PROJECTS

PPL invites projects that constructively consider situation, context, and consequences of performative socialization and enculturation. The site will be adapted to each project, aiming for explicit realization of social forms.

PROPOSALS can use this ONLINE WORKSHEET, or be emailed in other forms to: panoplylab@gmail.com on a rolling basis.

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OPEN CALL for ARTISTS AND ARTIST-CURATORS
A framing of performance and social practices as “art” implicates us in markets, histories, criticisms and theoretics, individualist and institutional hierarchies, valuation and evaluation schemas, competition-based cultural systemics, expectations for rituality and metaphysical experience, etc. This call is open to “artists,” who navigate lives as “artists” and create “art” within and/or across defined artistic disciplines, as such, problemetizing and considering art-paradigms.

Proposals can be for individual performance processes/performances relating to one of the following forms-of-exhibition (ongoing), OR proposals can frame an entire exhibition with multiple artists, taking on a form that “curatorially” relates involved artistic processes and performance(s) of any length or design.

PERFORMANCY FORUM. A semi-monthly platform since 2009 for auto-criticality of show-forms and performance-as-art practices. Each exhibition involves interdisciplinary performance(s), and some form of public dialogue, usually focusing around an aesthetic, politic, personal, social issue or conceptual area. PERFORMANCY FORUM often involves exchanges between Brooklyn artists and artist collectives and groups from elsewhere in the world. Longer-form exhibitions, as well as conferences and festivals are also organized as part of PERFORMANCY FORUM, by Esther Neff and collaborators. Proposals can be for individual performances/processes and/or conceptual frameworks for an installment of the series. email: esthermneff@gmail.com

SuperCoda (curated by Valerie Kuehne) is accepting submissions for Trauma Salon, an ongoing attempt to define the nature of Trauma as a Performative Phenomenon. Submissions should both consider Trauma as you understand it (have been exposed to, seen/felt) and how and why that understanding might change if Trauma becomes the focus of a performance/experiment. This call is open to all disciplines. The following questions are to be addressed in your submission:
1. How does Art change you? Radically speaking, how does one lose oneself (as audience/performer) in witnessing/engaging in a performance and become someone completely different? Under what conditions do you think this internal shift might transpire.
2. Why is Performance necessary/urgent? How can this necessity be internalized and expressed? Why should it be? How can this necessity be used as a tool for perpetuating/embedding Performance as a social practice (or collective spirituality, modern catharsis, insert at will). In essence, why must we, as performers (as well as human beings) do what we do?
3. Why the the hell do you make art/performance/music? What is important in what you do? Why continue doing so?
Your proposal may suggest a means to inflict Trauma in performance. You may attempt to physically disclose and permanently lose/change yourself. You may find a way to be traumatized by the audience (or simply sign up for this). You may simply perform as a means to uncover the essence of Trauma as performatively expressed. You may make an enormous noise. You may tell us what you are truly afraid of. You may injure yourself. You may terrify everyone and no one. You may grow a second head. –curator Valerie Kuehne

Trauma Salon will take place on the last Thursday of the Month, January – April. Visit thesupercoda! email: valeriekuehne@gmail.com

Post-dance 4X4: To be “post” is to come after, proposing some reflection, perhaps, or some meta-physicality. Works-in-progress are shown as public experiments, situations emerge from dance and movement theory, history, and current dance/movement practices; the construction of a “post-dance community” is embodied, as participatory social choreogaphy. This series also welcomes curators and co-curators, all participants are paid from donations at the door, artists tend to “gather” over time and events emerge from need to operate as dance. The term “post-dance” was coined by Lindsey Drury for BIPAF, at PPL the series has been curated and co-curated by Lorene Bouboushian, Li Cata, Kaia Gilje, Paige Fredlund, and Esther Neff.

Post-drama 4X4: text-based performance forms, dramaturgy and anthropology-located and theatrical forms emerging from “the theater” are removed from theater, challenging theater’s metaphorical and allegorical (historic) relationships with “society.” There is no stage or backstage, all elements of the situation and production values are operated by and as part of the “play.” Durational, participatory, aleatoric, improvisational, environmental, site-specific, and other “post-dramatic” forms are investigated, theater is framed as theoretics. Propose a form of play, a theater-work in-process; forms involving speech, sound, and music especially welcome.

No Wave Performance Task Force: queer and feminist public performance, sculpture, activist, and movement practices, from the concept of a “task force” formed over time through meetings and exhibitions. NWPTF can be initiated by any, and should take task-based form(s). Visit NWPTF website HERE for more information.

OTHER: many many other forms and modes are welcome. PPL has hosted platforms and curatorial projects by many others, including performance art exhibitions, potlucks, video and visual arts exhibitions by independent curators, public meetings and gatherings, research and social arts practices, workshops and lectures, etc. It is impossible for us to totally predict all and any operations for the space: anything “outside” any of these areas is perhaps of even more interest.

megabus03Megabus Social Research Artists Retreat will take place January 24-25, 2015 on the Megabus from Boston to Brooklyn and back again, and in Brooklyn at Panoply Performance Laboratory.

TO APPLY: Send an abstract, diagram, proposal, or other document representing your social research performance as a proposal and to be shared at PPL during the retreat by a deadline ****December 20, 2015**** to panoplylab@gmail.com with the subject line MEGABUS RETREAT

Priority will be given to proposal that “make use” of the Megabus trip. 

Artists receive:
–1 roundtrip megabus ticket between Boston to NYC
–A yoga-mat slumber-party-style place to stay (optional)
–dinner
–A public laboratory session with peer participants available for your social research in any form

Artists must provide:
–An abstract, diagram, or other document representing their current social research as a proposal and to be shared at PPL during the retreat
–A structure for a minimum of 30 minutes of laboratory time (“performance”) between 7pm and midnight on Saturday, January 24

Schedule:

Departing Bus:
Date: January 24, 2015
From: Boston, MA, South Station – Gate 25 (12:00 PM)
To: New York, NY, 7th Ave & 28th St. (4:55 PM)

Arrive at PPL (104 Meserole Street, Brooklyn, NY, 11206)
Seven laboratory sessions, 8pm-midnight

Returning Bus:
Date: January 26, 2015
From: New York, NY, 34th St b/t 11th Ave and 12th Ave (12:30 AM)
To: Boston, MA, South Station – Gate 13 (4:45 AM)

In ongoing dealings with performance art and its modes of production,  PPL release the Summer 2014 Open Call.

PF_opencall

DEADLINE: JUNE 19, 2014
EXHIBITION: JULY 19, 2014

Can performance artists “emerge”? Are we looking to “establish” and “become visible?” (if so, what do we mean by this?) Are we trying to become famous? Is your cause an emergency? Do you need something? Do you have something you want seen? We coin a term, “EV” (“Emergency Visibility”) to describe, in general and in specificity, the ways in which live performance art problematizes these concerns and often subverts conceptual, economic, and other formal paradigms.

PERFORMANCY FORUM is a platform, it holds you up, but only so that you can be seen as part of an immediate situation by a living witnesses, who exist with you in the here and now. There is no visibility beyond the present tense, no life to the work beyond it’s liveness. There may be taken photographs or video. There may be post-performance discussion. But there will be only subjective schemas by which you may measure whether or not the performance you made became visible.

Please make proposals (ideally in debate with the above) for performances to occur on SATURDAY, JULY 19, 2014 at Panoply Performance Laboratory in Brooklyn, NY.

ⓞINCLUDE IN YOUR PROPOSALⓞ

duration
tech needs
description
links to past work

in an email to: PANOPLYLAB@GMAIL.COM

FIVE ARTISTS will be selected to create performance works for the evening at PPL.
Preference is given to artists who have not performed here before (NEW BLOOD).

Artists receive all donations from the door and free beer all night + a souvenir screenshot of the Facebook event page*

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*Unfortunately we do not have funds to support travel to or housing in NYC, we are a studio space run by artists, not an institution.

Thank you to Sindy Butz, Ivy Castellanos, Amber Lee, and Hilary Sand for four remarkable durational performances yesterday, Saturday February 16.

Here is some photo documentation:

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Craft is a process-object, a powerful alternative trajectory of being in time, it is act and image, its own index and its own result. Inside craft, time stops and function splits conceptually into multiple potentials: material use, catalysis of transcendental states, nonlinear cause and effect relationships with ephemeral existence, literal and metaphorical creation of new forms. These four artists use crafts, the craft, craftiness, and crafting to deal with history, technology/technique, forms of knowledge, the body and womanhood, human agency, and power:

Sindy Butz and Ivy Castellanos have know-how. Their practices include wearable sculptures made with porcelain, molded Styrofoam, and layers of paint (respectively) and more. They apply techniques they’ve tested and developed over time, skilled use of materials, teachable, repeatable techniques and new techniques they’ve invented. As their know-how, the technical, blends with performative task, their bodies become both consciously crafting agents and remain objects themselves. As predominantly constructive sets of skills, “crafts” used in performance emphasizes the problematics of human agency in its most literal forms by demonstrating the complexities of cause and effect relationships between an individual and the material world as well as grey areas between animacy and. inanimacy. The craft, or witchcraft, takes agency a step further into the immaterial, into projection of energies and molding of time and space. Amber Lee frames spellcasting as performance, practicing re-designed forms of rituals meant to operate effectively beyond the immediate situation. She harnesses the repetition of certain performances throughout time, drawing from traditions and beliefs that have been practiced for centuries. In this case, spells themselves are crafts, patterns of symbols, instructions for the body, words imbued with meaning and power. The power of know-how, craftiness, is a form of social and spiritual intelligence. For Hilary Sand (see her text on the next page), craftiness is a practically political situation, a state of self-recognition and confidence that deals with dominant power paradigms and negotiates social evolution. Hilary’s ongoing use of textiles allows her to allude to crafts that have been gradually excised from daily life, crafts that once clothed the body, crafts that once defined womanhood. In that her wrapping, tangling, and weaving is “nonfunctional” it asks us to evaluate which know-hows (aesthetic? critical?) we choose to practice and how.

-curator

Value of Variety

Hilary Sand

How did my grandmother know that salt immediately applied can lift red wine stains? Or that vinegar is a perfectly efficient cleaning material: safe to eat, safe to breathe, safe to touch, and chemical-free? How did my grandfather know to make a fishing pole out of reeds and not branches, so it would be bendy enough to give when the fish pulls? Or that perch especially love corn? Why didn’t my grandparents need self-help books to stay slender, or understand their children, or figure out their interpersonal relationships? What did they know about the world, their minds, their bodies, which I do not?

We have become so specialized that we do not trust ourselves to fix a hole in the wall without calling a professional. Many times, we are not wrong. But someone will always be able to do something better than you when you do not even once make the attempt. We often do not feel compelled even to attempt things any more. In “Art and Work,” an essay published in 1965, Harold Rosenberg said “The ideal vista for the future is clear: it is that self-development shall be the motive of all work. If that ideal prevails, the distinction between the arts and other human enterprises will become meaningless.”[1] Forty-eight years later, while the rest of the populace never seems to have gotten Rosenberg’s memo, I think this is becoming more than an ideal for artists, it is a goal. Interdisciplinarity and community-based art practice are its heralds: we are beginning to not only share what we know, and to expand the fields of our knowledge, but to strive for cohesion and synthesis among these spaces.

Today, we can look things up, to verify with the voices of millions online that my grandparents’ tricks will work, that they do work. But I don’t like corn, I buy my fish in pieces from the grocery store where it does not look back at me with a forlorn expression, and I most definitely trust Windex over vinegar to keep my windows shiny and Shout over salt to keep my fabrics pristine. I buy bags of cookies and boxes of crunchy cheese crackers and make myself sick with snacks (mostly metaphorically). I have read many words about how to live in today’s world. I do not think that I am happier than my grandparents were. But, I do have a bonus: I have them.

I am carrying around a host of historical knowledge, though it is small knowledge by many standards. It is unused knowledge; it is even perhaps redundant knowledge—in light of the unlikelihood of a sudden change in our socio-economic cultural structures or of the absolute death of my ambitions. But, like non-coding genes in our DNA and vestigial structures that are no longer actualized in the systems of the body,  this knowledge will sit in my bones and live in my mind until it becomes evolutionarily beneficial once again.

I recently spilled red wine on a white dress at an art opening, and the gallery didn’t have any stain-removers, but they did have salt. It works just fine.


[1] Harold Rosenberg, “Art and Work” in Discovering the Present, (Chicago and London:The University of Chicago Press, 1973), 68.

IV Soldiers in 2011

IV Soldiers in 2011

While the commercial art world struggles to fit the performance practices of artists today into existing market models and performance artists struggle to fit their practices into existing market models and/or to resist existing market models, Ivy Castellanos, director and curator of IV Soldiers Gallery has come a long way in the past two years her storefront gallery has been open on Noll Street towards developing new modes for the presentation of Performance Art.

Slash and Burn is characteristic of Castellanos’ curatorial methodology, involving artists in a sequence of Thursday night performances and inviting them to create new performances following an action-based directive. In this case, artists have been encouraged to “resist resistance, succumb to violent impulse, insist, enforce, make space,” a directive that Castellanos identifies as a “representative aesthetic” of the gallery, drawing on her own military background and interest in the conflux between performance art and social justice. The action-based directive, the opportunity to work on a performance with a public audience over the course of three nights, and the presentation of the work in a visual arts context all provide a concrete platform for realizing performance art

IV Soldiers in 2012, 'Transformation' performance in progress

IV Soldiers in 2012, ‘Transformation’ performance in progress

blog3as a discipline. Past exhibitions at IV Soldiers have similarly provided a conceptual directive, from ‘to campaign, to advocate” for Campaign, the gallery’s inaugural exhibition, through public can collecting and social projects during iCan in October 2012, through ‘to collaboratively and improvisationally build a conceptual treehouse, to use a site, to perform using each other’ for Transformations in November, 2012.

For SLASH AND BURN: Performance Art, each night will present the performance work of Lindsey Drury, Hiroshi Shafer, Valerie Kuehne, and PPL (Esther Neff and Brian McCorkle). Performance exhibition nights are free and open to the public.

slashandburn

SLASH AND BURN: Performance Art

Thursdays, January 17, 24, and 31
 8pm-10pm 

IV Soldiers Gallery
184 Noll Street
Bushwick, Brooklyn

valerie

Valerie Kuehne

Ivy Castellanos at MANA Contemporary in Chicago, on tour with PPL and Valerie Kuehne

Ivy Castellanos

lindsey

Lindsey Drury

hiroshi

Hiroshi Shafer at IV Soldiers

“Practice” is a term generally used to describe an artist’s way of doing things; their ever-evolving art-making processes as structured by ideology, theoretical concerns, practical considerations, techniques, methodology, disciplinary influences, and the daily functions of the individual(s) “maintaining” or “pursuing” this practice.  The idea of “practice” may be used as an umbrella term for interrelated parts of art-making, referencing disciplinary rehearsal towards mastery of technical components (as in, the violinist practices the violin), but also involving modes of production (how art is made, how its making operates in conjunction with social, economic, and political structures), and how the artist makes the work itself (as in, the painter gessoes aluminum sheets), with an emphasis on the relationships between these and an artist’s deliberately constructed conceptual framework for each and all.

In the past 40 or so years, ideas of “artistic practice” have been formalized by educational theory and psychology to describe frameworks for learning art-making. New ways of thinking about how an individual becomes an artist were necessary as institutions took over the education of artists from systems of private apprenticeship and amateur emergence. In addition to providing a conceptual argument for institutional artist education, theories using the term “artistic practice” are now often geared towards helping young artists make their aesthetic and formal choices consistently, and to help them develop cohesive “voices” or “visions” beyond their technical training, i.e. to develop a factory a la Andy Warhol inside which consistently viable and valuable artistic products are produced.

Towards this end, conception of this practical framework called “practice” has encouraged educational curriculums to assist students in designing individual practices, with design largely involving the translation of institutionally-imparted “information” into a productive synthesis of existing components. Likewise, these conceptions are applied to educating “the public” about art, and “knowledge of art” at large. John Falk and Lynn Dierking in Learning From Museums write that “As our society is increasingly inundated with information each individual needs to learn qualitatively and quantitatively better strategies for dealing with information.” For them, as for many educators at museums, universities, and conservatories, “information” describes the documented processes and contexts of well-known artists throughout history, theoretical positions and statements from art criticism, history, and theory, and existing artwork or its documentation and criticism. “Better strategies for dealing with information” then becomes the application of this autonomous, institutional “art sphere” information to individual art-making processes. This schema allows educational institutions to offer these “existing informations” as tools or applicable considerations to be purchased by students. It also helps professional artists to market their art as a product of legitimized and communicable processes, as “information” is consistently set into institutional vocabulary (dialectic, or rhetoric), and mimetically distributed (every art-world individual maintains the same set of facts, amounting to an education).

Problematics embedded in these institutional conceptions variously include reinforcement of strictly capitalist modes of production, discouragement of art that can’t be “explained” or otherwise given value based on past value of similar canonical products, discouragement from generative theorization and theory stemming from non-art-historical/non-canonical sources, the misconception of learning as a “filling of an empty vessel,” etc. These schemas of homogenization, autonomization, education, and hierarchization ultimately discourage artists from synthesizing and controlling their own culturally responsive practices. Moreover, we could certainly argue (similarly yet totally differently than Claire Bishop does in her recent Artificial Hells: Participatory Art and the Politics of Spectatorship,) that institutional conceptions of practice prevent artists from effectively functioning as agents in the co-construction of human culture.

Moreover, reactions to these institutionally-formalized conceptions of “practice” have caused many artists to reject intellectual considerations in their own practices and to cease exploration of art history and theory across contexts, fields, and sources. Thus, we may find ourselves denying our constantstate of learning in the world and through our art-making processes. We must remember that not all learning theories advocate the development of a single, set-in-stone, marketable, “A Practice” based on a “dealing with” information; the extent to which “A Practice” can be/should be sustained throughout time by an individual, can be/should be borrowed as a framework by another individual, or can be/should be analyzed as such, are debates that

still from Chelsea Knight’s video work ‘Frame’

emerge from conception of “A Practice” as an artistic product in and of itself, something an artist or artist group “has” rather than something that he/she/they practice(s) as a course of action. We must remember that we are responsible for our own practices. Even constructivist epistemologist Lev Vygotsky, who is often credited with the conception of “framework” as a way of seeing/perceiving concepts, argues that learning happens through social interaction and that “information” is only viable during the active processes/practice of its synthesis. For Vygotsky, and perhaps for many actual working artists, practice is the action of framing, not a set of rules constructing a frame.

There is nothing to master, there is only performance.

My thinking about these “frames” for “practice” has been recently stimulated by the work of Lital Dotan and Eyal Perry, and their Glasshouse Project. Currently central to their project’s work is been a series of “homage” performances, with artists invited to create work in response to, and influenced by the performances, theories, and practices of artists like Ana Mendieta (September), Allan Kaprow (October), and next, Rirkrit Tiravanija (November).  

Ivy Castellanos performing during HOMAGE TO ANA MENDIETA, September 2012

These exhibitions are not meant to educate a public or to educate individual artists through re-performance of the works of well-known performance artists. Re-performance is part of a debate that continues to frame artistic practice as a set of something, a product, or a factory for producing products (see Istvan Meszaros). As such, “re-performance” is currently being masticated by arguments over context, liveness, and location of the author. These arguments maintain some confusion, as they are additionally framed by “performance art,” a discipline so “practice-based” in the Vygotsky sense that its products are nearly impossible to define as such (and we like it that way.)

What Dotan and Perry invite artists to do is 1.) Consider frameworks of practice and education themselves, i.e. the very modes of learning that artists practice, 2.) identify “practical” decisions in the work of others and in their own work and 3.) engage in artistic research as part of personal practice outside of institutional learning.

PPL include Esther Neff, Jessica Bathurst, Michael Newton, Brian McCorkle (seen above in documentation of PPL Help the Water, photo by Geraldo Mercado)

This month, PPL are working at Glasshouse in homage to Allan Kaprow. As we develop this night of performance (which has already been framed as such, ruling out practice of many of Kaprow’s modes) I am attempting to follow my own neural and practical pathways towards synthesis of information (which is unlimited and un-framed) and translation (via subjective association) of it into artistic practice. More than any other “influence,” Kaprow encouraged his students and fellow artists to practice in practice, to perform by performing, to learn by learning. It’s not easy; my own mind tries to frame decisions about what we will actually do in the space through a Lacanian lens (Imaginary, the Symbolic and the Real = Fraud, Absence and Impossibility), for example, just as Kaprow’s quote “The point is to do something that doesn’t even remotely remind you of culture” glares at me from the top of the piano (see right). Ultimately, my core focus as an artist working in this situation (in homage to Kaprow, as ourselves, in that space, etc) is to practice framing as an act.  I want to research the timing of artistic decisions throughout situations, to experience different relationships between spectators, artists, and participants, and to work against representation, sure. However, those interests must function as frameworks for collective practicing of practices. After October 26th is over, PPL may decide to transfer similar frameworks into our ongoing opera project Any Size Mirror is a Dictator, but ultimately we do not intend to permanently learn how to do something, not how it should be done based on Kaprow’s views, nor how ‘an artist’ should ‘deal with’ the ‘information’ of his past practices.

Our practical research will be free and open to the public, taking place over the course of 4 hours:

HOMAGE TO ALLAN KAPROW
Friday, October 26, 2012
7pm-11pm

Glasshouse Projects
246 Union Avenue
Brooklyn, NY

Eyal Perry (left) and Lital Dotan (right)

Glasshouse Project is an artistic home-laboratory of artists Lital Dotan & Eyal Perry. It’s aim is to promote artistic experiments that are based on performance and installation art in the domestic space. The space is constantly transforming from a home into a stage, a playground, a classroom and so on, making the domestic environment a platform of constant physical and mental exploration.

Since 2007, the project and the home it utilizes have evolved, moving between residential and commercial venues in Tel-Aviv, Israel, San-Francisco, USA and elsewhere in Europe. Now, Glasshouse Projects has moved into a two-floor apartment in Brooklyn. With a large storefront gallery and all rooms, including kitchen, bedrooms, and outdoor patio open to artists, Glasshouse hosts performance evenings and an international residency program, where artists from around the world are invited to create performance art projects.

Additionally, Glasshouse TUESDAYS will occur next week:

On the Blurring of Art and Life/ Lecture & Discussion
Tuesday, October 23, 8pm

Eyal Perry will discuss Allan Kaprow’s Happenings.

–Esther Neff

Bushwick Open Studios emerges from the art that always exists in Bushwick, the graffiti and public art, the installations both intentional and indeterminate, out of the garages of artist-run spaces and artist studios, the independent galleries, the pop-up shows and rooftop parties, and so on and so forth, and because of this, BOS in 2011 is still a de-hierarchized and completely free festival of everything from advertising students showing the logos they’ve designed and drinking PBR through  very well known art world personalities and artists sitting casually around their studios and spaces.  (emergence below)

We wandered all over, interested primarily in collaborations and performance, from NORTE MAAR to see the collaborative drawings and hear about the remaining Rooftop Dances that need to be attended!, through the studio of Meghan Keane, where we met the founders of Pillow Culture, artists coming together to make pillows based on U.S. pillow patents, until it was time to go to Grace Space, home to all performance as gory, glorious, and grim (needed another “g” world, mean that as a good thing) as performance can be. Marni Kotak had us write advice to her as an expecting mother, while cradling, nursing, and punishing dolls/stuffed animals, all bearing screenprinted photos of her own face at various ages, Quinn Dukes wore a large basket collar filled with flour as she dealt with boots and shoes full of coal, extracting lumps of coal from the tips of the shoes and sometimes pounding on them with a shoe heel, transferring water from a bowl, from boot to boot, kneeling in more flour behind a little can full of coals and fire, which she extinguished with a glob of water-flour dough, all tasks performed with concentration:

Anya Liftig entered in a black suit with black gloves on her feet, undressed, and performed the deceptively simple action of becoming a raw chicken, or comparing herself to a raw chicken, or playing with chickens (see, it’s just actually very complicated and somehow terribly “right” and descriptions only mess live performance up, I shouldn’t even be writing this post attempting to describe performances at all) but it definitely shook the audience up in a wide range of ways, from full laughter to gasps, and etc. One of the reasons I’m such a huge fan of Anya’s work is that it’s really theatrical, but I’m not sure what that means either…

Rebecca Jampol performed with a notepad, pen, chair, and a bucket of water, chewing and spitting out notes, writing them, at two points speaking out loud, and finally dunking her head in the bucket of water, followed by Meghan Van Alstyne, who rubbed salt on the lips of audience members, whispering into their ears, poured the sack of salt over her head, and then stuck syringes into her chest around her breastbone. She then fell allowed herself to fall backwards into the salt.

You really had to be there! I wish you had been there. While at Grace Space, we also had the opportunity to meet Vandana Jain and hear about her collaboration with Nina Morrison…here’s a recent Brooklyn Rail article about Grace Space and its history, founders, “aesthetic,” etc.

I’d go on and on but walking around Bushwick without consuming anything but beer all day has kind of worn me out…

You are cordially invited!

May 21st and 22nd 2011 at University of the Streets.

This conference, MODE, METHOD, MEDIUM brings together artists and cultural organizers who work between disciplines both in terms of medium and in terms economic/field-based distinctions. We hope to take a step towards dialectic and artistic solidarity between the independent and ‘avant-garde’ communities in dance, performance art, theater, and music, and to share our vocabularies and methods.

Presentations will include performances, project presentations, artist talks, papers, and interactive workshops.

Inherently and formally political, often interactive and/or participatory,  always startling and deeply considerate, artists, curators, scholars, and cultural organizers will share their work, discuss their practices, and participate to two open round-tables about what “medium,” as a mode of transmission, means to us now.

Saturday, May 21, 2pm-6pm
Sunday, May 22, 2pm-10pm

Public round-tables at 4pm both days

University of the Streets
130 East 7th Street (between 1st Avenue and Avenue A)
New York, NY 10009-6164

Open to the Public
Free

Participating artists and companies include:

Handan Ozbilgin, showing part three of her MAIDS project, members of experimental music ensemble thingNY, Ben Spatz/Urban Research Theater, JJ Lind and Liz Vacco of Immediate Medium, Peruvian artist Amapola Prada and her Lima New York Project, participatory performance art-ist Carrie Dashow, cultural organizer/icon Jason Andrew, sound and movement researchers William Bilwa Costa and Martin Lanz Landazari, Ashley Kelly-Tata of Enthuse Theater, the pyromaniacs from Aztec Economy, Melanie Armer and Chance Mueleck of Nerve Tank, GoGoVertigoat’s Lindsey Drury, and interdisciplinary practitioners Sarah Maxfield, Angela Washko, Rebecca Patek, Nate Hill, Hyatt Michaels, Gelsey Bell, Dave Thrasher, and many others!

SCHEDULE:

Saturday, May 21

2-3:00
Handan Ozbilgin (MAIDS)
3:15pm-3:25
Dave Thrasher
3:25-4:00
Hyatt Michaels
Carrie Dashow
4:15pm-5pm: round-table 1
medium, mode, method (emphasis on participation)
5-5:30
Amapola Prada
5:30-6pm

thingNY

Sunday, May 22nd

2pm-3:15 pm
Hector Canonge
3:15 -4pm Nate Hill
4pm-5:00pm: round-table 2
medium, mode, method (emphasis on discipline)
5:00 performances
Angela Washko
5:30-7pm: presentations/artist talks

Jason Andrew
Gelsey Bell
Sarah Maxfield
The Nerve Tank
7:00
William Bilwa Costa, Rebecca Patek, Martin Lanz Landazari
8pm
Lindsey Drury
8:45-9pm (clean up and short break)
9:00pm

Ben Spatz/Urban Research Theater
10pm
Aztec Economy
STRIKE
11-end

This conference is organized by Esther Neff of the Panoply Performance Laboratory, with advice from The Nerve Tank! Thanks to all participants, who have created the form of this weekend.

Contact: panoplylab@gmail.com