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Tag Archives: Brian McCorkle

Photo documentation is up:

http://panoplylab.org/quinquennial/

THANK YOU to all who performed, presented, participated, attended, witnessed, and spoke!!!!

Quinn Dukes performing durationally at Grace Exhibition Space, Day 2

Quinn Dukes performing durationally at Grace Exhibition Space, Day 2

PRACTING_petrichorbannerPetrichor Performance Collective and Panoply Performance Laboratory present an exchange of ideas and performative works in Brooklyn and Boston entitled Practice, Practicing, and the Perpetual Becoming of Performance

Friday, November 7 
Roundtable Discussion: 6pm
Performances: 7pm-11pm

Saturday, November 8
Performances: 7pm-11pm

@
PPL Space
104 Meserole Street
Brooklyn, NY, 11206

(L to Montrose, G to Broadway, M to Lorimer)
FREE (suggested donation $5-15 for the artists’ travel)

Participating Artists from Petrichor:
Danielle Abrams, Leah Rafaela Ceriello, Dell M. Hamilton, Tiara Jenkins, Ryan McMahon, Helina Metaferia, Cris Schayer, Bryana Siobhan, Kledia Spiro, Nathaniel Wyrick

Byana_petrichor(Photo above: Bryana Siobhán, azul negro, at Piano Craft Guild)

The following weekend, PPL will complete the exchange in Boston at the School for the Museum of Fine Arts:

Friday, November 15
Roundtable Discussion: 6pm
Performances: 7pm-11pm

Saturday, November 16
Performances: 7-11pm
@
School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
230 The Fenway
Boston, Massachusetts 02115

Participating Artists Include: Chloe Bass, Ayana Evans, Anya Liftig, Kikuko Tanaka, Zhenesse Heineman, Future Death Toll (Edward Sharp and David Griess), Esther Neff and Brian McCorkle (PPL), Glasshouse Project (Lital Dotan and Eyal Perry), Ivy Castellanos, and Wild Torus (Amy Mathis and Mike Voztok).

s2590047(Photo above: Kikuko Tanaka, Poultry Paradise and its Discontents (2013), PPL Space, Photo by Hiroshi Shafer)


ABOUT THE EXCHANGE:

How does an artist design and practice a practice? More importantly, how does an artist practice within constantly fluctuating ways of learning? This performance exchange is meant to address questions of process and pedagogy and to interrogate collectivity and community as a part of the practices of artists operating in Boston, New York City, and beyond.

Performance art, termed as such, has experienced a major shift between 2006 and 2014 “inside” and “outside” art worlds. The “professional” artists from the NYC area and student artists alike will ask critical questions of themselves and each other to determine how the MFA program, the collective, the artspace, the panel discussion, and other forms of social learning, are integrated within performance art practices today. The artists will question pedagogy, community, collectivity, and how our organizational and pedagogical practices operate in conflux with our performance work. Group discussions in each location with be focused around making a practice and will be allowed to digress in any of these directions.  This exchange is curated/organized by Helina Metaferia and Esther Neff, respective members of Petrichor and Panoply.


 danielleabrams(Photo above: Danielle Abrams, video still: Quadroon)

About Petrichor Performance Collective:
Petrichor is a performing arts collective operating and performing in Boston, MA, founded by MFA students, alumni, and friends of School of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Facebook: PetrichorPerformanceCollective

About Panoply Performance Laboratory (PPL) is a duo of performance artists, a collective involving anyone who participates in any PPL operations, and an investigative project space in Brooklyn, NY that hosts performance and social projects. PPL has initiated Brooklyn International Performance Art Festival, conferences-as-mass performances, and organized PERFORMANCY FORUM (a critical platform for performance-as-theory) since 2009. www.panoplylab.org

kerwinppl(PPL Space, a project of the Panoply Performance Laboratory (Esther Neff and Brian McCorkle). Photo by Kerwin Williamson)


BIOS of BOSTON-BASED ARTISTS, MEMBERS OF PETRICHOR

Helina Metaferia is an interdisciplinary visual artist working in two dimensional, three dimensional, and time-based mediums. Born in Washington, DC to Ethiopian parents, Helina’s work is rooted in diaspora, migration and gender studies through an exploration of the body. Her work has been exhibited at Galeria Labirynt (Lublin, Poland), Emerson College Gallery (Boston, MA), International Visions Gallery (Washington, DC), Casa Frela Gallery (New York, NY), Williams College Gallery (Williamstown, MA), and more. She recently performed at the Guggenheim Museum with Afro-Cuban artist Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons in honor of the Carrie Mae Weems retrospective exhibition. www.helinametaferia.com

Leah Rafaela Ceriello: b. 1989. New Hampshire USA. What has come before you? what will remain after you’re gone http://www.leahrafaela.com/

Tiara Jenkins is a Boston based performance artist. She was raised in Pittsburg, Missouri on a 40 acre farm. Since moving to Boston three years ago, she has been considering processes of acculturation and questioning how an individual’s life dreams and goals are formed, crushed, and reformed.

Kledia Spiro is an interdisciplinary artist experimenting with intense physical actions and understanding the internal dialogue and struggle that occur before, during, and after the action.  Kledia was born in Albania and is part of an Olympic Weightlifting team. She uses weightlifting as a symbol of empowerment and pain. Weightlifting becomes a vehicle for discussing women’s role in society, immigration and times of war.

Nathaniel Wyrick is a multidisciplinary artist born in East Tennessee and currently living and working in Boston. Working through performance, printmaking, photography, and installation he explores the fragility and imperfection of memory as it relates to personal history, identity, masculinity, and sexuality. www.nathanielwyrick.com

Cris Schayer, New Orleans artist currently based in Boston. Examining the perception of memory, language, and identities, she works with the ephemerality of time based durational performances yielding residual objects. The residue becomes a compulsive attempt to solidify the intangible. www.crisschayer.com

Dell M. Hamilton is an artist, writer, activist and curator based in Boston. Born in Spanish Harlem and spending her formative years in the Bronx borough of New York, she was raised in a bilingual as well as a multi-racial Honduran family. Her work is grounded in the interdisciplinary contexts of the African Diaspora and she has most recently performed with Afro-Cuban artist, Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons as part of MacArthur Genius Award winner Carrie Mae Weems’s retrospective show at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York. Dell’s work has been shown to a wide variety of audiences at the Museum of Fine Arts (Boston), Paragraph Gallery (St. Louis), Spoke Gallery/Medicine Wheel Productions (Boston), NK Gallery (Boston), Mobius (Boston), OKW Gallery (Boston), the Fort Port Artist Building (Boston), Atlantic Works (Boston), the Joan Resnikoff Gallery/Roxbury Community College (Boston), the Massachusetts State House (Boston) and at Perfolink: Maestros y Discipulos in Concepción, Chile. www.dellmhamilton.com

Emerging artist Bryana Siobhan is currently a Masters Candidate at the School of the Museum of Fine art of Boston, and an Alumni of the Corcoran College of Art + Design with her Bachelors in Fine Art.  She has been living and working in Boston, MA for the past years as a performance artist, founder ofrevolutionaryperformance.tumblr.com (a performance art archive), as a founding member of Petrichor Performance Collective and member of Que Lastima! Working in the topic of US-centric social politics regarding race, gender, and mental health, and spirituality, Siobhan draws cultural cues and signifiers from the Black American, Afro-Cuban and Indigenous American (NDN) cultures. bryanasiobhan.comrevolutionaryperformance.tumblr.com

Danielle Abrams has performed for over 20 years as personae that emerge from her interracial family, and from a lexicon of figures in art history and popular culture. Her performances upend the limits of stereotype and representation.  As each of Abrams’ characters transfigure into new ones, prejudicial assumptions are traded in for complex and candid dialogues. Danielle Abrams has performed and exhibited work at galleries, festivals, and museums in New York including the Queens Museum, Bronx Museum of Art, The Jewish Museum, Roger Smith Hotel, WOW Performance Café, The Kitchen, Rush Arts Gallery, ABC No Rio, and Dixon Place.  She has also exhibited work nationally and internationally at Detroit Institute of the Arts, the Queer Arts Festival, Labotanica at Project Row Houses, Annie Sprinkle’s and Beth Stephens’ Green Wedding, Art Gallery of Windsor, and The Geborgen Kamers Gallery in the Netherlands. She teaches Performance at The School of Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. www.danielleabrams.com

Ryan C. McMahon: “I was injured and hospitalized during the Boston Marathon Explosions with a major back injury and two broken wrists. “You’re Ok” explores my recovery and the healing process. I have been researching how other artists like Harun Farocki, Hito Steyerl, Stanya Kahn, Jon Rafman, Hannah Wilke and Liza Johnson uncover the effects of war, trauma and violent events. I’m also very interested in how groups, communities and cities grieve and heal collectively. Using texts from Trauma Studies I am exploring and documenting the impacts of psychological and physical trauma on an individual (myself), my family, my immediate community, and on the city as a whole while also looking at the contrasting methods that the mass media has used to process the event. The body’s healing time vs. media time.” http://www.ryancmcphoto.com/

BIOS of NEW YORK CITY-BASED ARTISTS, CURATED BY PPL

Chloë Bass Rehearsal for Regular Social Behavior” Chloë Bass is a conceptual artist working in performance, situation, publication, and installation. Chloë has received commissions from LUMEN, the Culture Project’s Women Center Stage Festival, the Bushwick Starr’s Bushwhack Festival, and 3rd Ward’s Moviehouse. She has received residencies from the Bemis Center (Omaha, Nebraska), POGON (Zagreb, Croatia), D21 Kunstraum/5533 art space (Leipzig, Germany and Istanbul, Turkey), and Eyebeam (New York). Recent work has been seen at the Neuberger Museum, Momenta Art, Künstlerhaus Stuttgart, Flux Factory, Kunstkammer AZB (Zürich), Akademie Schloss Solitude, Exit Art, Contemporary Art Institute of Detroit, ITINERANT Performance Festival, Glasshouse, Panoply Performance Laboratory, and Agape Enterprise, among others. Selected profiles of her work have appeared in BOMB, Entorno, ArtInfo, Art Observed, and Hyperallergic. She is a the recipient of the 2014 Create Change Residency from the Laundromat Project, the 2013 Fellowship for Utopian Practice from Culture Push and is a 2011 & 2012 Rema Hort Mann Foundation Individual Artist Grant Nominee. From 2007 – 2011, Chloë served as the co-lead organizer for Arts in Bushwick, which produces Bushwick Open Studios, BETA Spaces, and Armory Arts Week performance festival SITE Fest, which she founded. She has guest lectured at Parsons School of Design, Sotheby’s Institute, the Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, and Brooklyn College CUNY. She holds a BA in Theater Studies from Yale University, and an MFA in Performance and Interactive Media Arts (PIMA) from Brooklyn College. chloebass.com

Ayana M. Evans currently resides in New York, home base for her work as a performance artist and accessories designer. She frequently visits her hometown of Chicago, a city whose “all-American” and sometimes controversial reputation has been a major influence on her art making practices, either as ideals she challenges or as nostalgia for histories she cannot re-create.  Her own family’s roots in the South and her identity as an African American woman add another significant layer to her performance works, which are often presented as critical or banal queries that involve her body. Evans received her MFA in painting from Tyler School of Art at Temple University and her BA in Visual Arts from Brown University.  She has also attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture as well as the Vermont Studio Center.  Recent exhibits include: “Time Distortion and the Body” at Panoply Performance Laboratory, Brooklyn, “A Box in the World,” sponsored by Local Projects, Queens, “All that Glitters,” at The Gateway Project, Newark, “Operation Catsuit” video, screened at Panoply Performance Laboratory, Brooklyn, and “Everything Is Up For Grabs,” performance art piece choreographed by Whitney Hunter and shown at Judson Church, New York.  Evans’ accessories line, Yana handbags, was launched in 2007 and has been featured in EssenceNylonMarie Claire, TimeOut NY and the L.A. Timesayanaevans.com

Anya Liftig’s work has been featured at TATE Modern, MOMA, The New Museum, Trouw Amsterdam (collab with Stedelijk Museum, CPR, Highways Performance Space, Lapsody4 Finland, Fado Toronto, 7a11d International Performance Festival, Performance Art Institute-San Francisco, Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, The Kitchen at the Independent Art Fair, Performer Stammtisch Berlin, OVADA, Joyce Soho and many other venues around the globe. In “The Anxiety of Influence” she dressed exactly like Marina Abramovic and sat across from her all day during “The Artist is Present” exhibition. Her work has been published and written about in The New York Times MagazineBOMBThe Wall Street JournalVogue ItaliaNext MagazineNow and ThenStay ThirstyNew York MagazineGothamistJezebelHyperallergicBad at SportsThe Other Journal, and many others. She is a graduate of Yale University and Georgia State University and has received grant and residency support from The MacDowell Colony, Atlantic Center for the Arts, The New Museum, Mertz Gilmore Foundation, Flux Projects, University of Antioquia and Casa Tres Patios-Medellin, Colombia. She is the recipient of a 2014-2015 Franklin Furnace Award for a series of interventions in museums throughout New York mimicking the gestures of animals depicted in Old Master paintings and sculptures. In November 2014 she will release her first self-published artists’ book, entitled Rejection, Just Over 15 years of Ambition, which was featured in the D.A.P. publication, On Art and Life, by Stuart Horodner.  Purchasers receive a one of a kind portfolio box with a copy of every rejection letter Liftig has received to date.  Every year, purchasers receive a packet with the rejection letters of that calendar year to update their collection.  Their purchases also fund the production of a duplicate edition of Rejection which is sent to an institution of their selection from an index of all the organizations that have ever rejected the artist.  Please contact the artist directly for more information or to purchase a copy.  Upcoming performances include performing in: Screening Room, or, The Return of Andrea Kleine (as revealed through a re-enactment of a 1977 television program about a ‘long and baffling’ film by Yvonne Rainer.) at The Chocolate Factory in Long Island City, Queens,  A performance/dance collaboration with Tess Dworman at Center for Performance Research, Brooklyn, NY, and AUNTS on Camera at The New Museum, NY.  anyaliftig.com

Lital Dotan & Eyal Perry (aka: Glasshouse) have been a collaborative team since 2001. Their work is best described as interdisciplinary performative art, integrating elements of video, photography and installation into performance; challenging ideas pertaining to the role of art in society, the role of the audience in art and the very nature of art itself. In their performative pieces they often involve the public, seriously examining public morality and the deeper, more hidden motivations behind social interactions. In 2010 the Glasshouse project was hosted by seminal performance artist Marina Abramovic at her institute in San Francisco. In addition to their work as Glasshouse, Lital & Eyal’s works have been exhibited internationally in museums and galleries (the Israel Museum, the San Francisco Jewish Modern and the National Museum in Cracow among others) and can be found in public and private collections worldwide. glasshouseproject.org

Future Death Toll’s David and Edward ask a lot of questions, like: how can we make performances with people not in the same room (would that also work for several performers in several different places)? is silence important? how far does our voice reach? how can this engage the public? what’s the most minimal amount of material required to conceptually encapsulate the relevant point? Answers become fodder for group collaboration and idea exchange through tools like open forum discussion, a/v recordings, and live video chat. Black trash bags, heavy breathing, sweat, mask, razors, and clothes are objects of ephemera & appropriated context; which may or may not be (or become) transcendental; which may or may not be well crafted; which may or may not really exist. What is seen? What is not seen? How is it that we can “see” what’s not there? And when you gaze long into an abyss the abyss also gazes into you (to borrow from Nietzsche). futuredeathtoll.com

Kikuko Tanaka: Hybrid Research, Poetic Amalgamation and Communication ” Born and raised in JapanKikuko Tanaka is a frantic thinker and practitioner currently based in New York. Her ongoing series of tragicomic epic “A Tragic Bambi” is an open-ended investigation of psychical histories that inform and condition the present. She has performed and exhibited in various venues, including Smack Mellon, Momenta Art, NARS Foundation, Center for Performance Research, Amelie A.Wallace gallery at SUNY Old Westbury, Vox Populi, Arario Gallery and Panoply Performance Laboratory among others. Her work has been favorably reviewed in Art in America, Art Info, and Hyperallergic. She was a nominatee for a Rema Hort Mann Foundation Visual Art Grant in 2010. She has an interdisciplinary background in her education. She holds a BS in Landscape Design from Chiba University, and has briefly studied fine art at School of Visual Arts, and has engaged in interdisciplinary studies at Hunter College and the CUNY Graduate Center, New York. She was a co-founder/ co-director of one-year artists’ project, Agape Enterprise, Brooklyn, New York, and is currently Administrative Director at Momenta Art, Brooklyn, New York. kikoworld.net

Ivy Castellanos is a performance artist and sculptor. Castellanos is the founder of IV Soldiers. ivycastellanos.com

Zhenesse Heinemann: “Ms Connections. Zhenesse Heinemann produces public programming, and curates and creates art in New York City and beyond.  She was born in Germany, grew up in Chicago, lived on the beach in Los Angeles, and has made a home in New York since 2004. zhenesse.com

WILD TORUS (WT) is the eccentric brainchild of male and female counterparts, Vlady VØz Tokk and Mág Ne Tá Z’air, in addition to their collaborating spawn. WT creates chaotic, cult happenings within multi-sensory installations. Working out of Capitol Beltway inbreeding in a post-Cold War malaise between clashing Russian bloodlines; mental contortion in the American South; abandoned, Castilian wormholes; gradual suburban numbing; and urban hyper-stimuli, WT aims to create a shared, collective experience with audiences. WT utilizes a combination of digital and physical means, like projection art and kinetic sculpture, to communicate major events that occur in the universe. Through an ephemeral process, WT’s constructed interventions alter its participants’ consciousness, as well as their corporeal position in society. The rituals activate a liminal space-time to personally deconstruct events of our contemporary reality, those which have been distorted through media sources and the Internet. Ultimately, the coming together of WT’s clashing identities, invented tools, and cryptic symbols through ritualistic experience erupts into an extreme, dystopian spectacle. wildtorus.tumblr.com

PPL (Esther Neff and Brian McCorkle): “Embarrassed of the (W)hole: Exchange with Petrichor” Panoply Performance Laboratory (PPL) operates across disciplines and spheres, constructing and participating in live situations. Projects such as operas, conferences, exhibitions, a miniature museum, tours, a performance space, an international festival, workshops, and other forms have been supported through Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Brooklyn Arts Council, LaGuardia Community College, University Settlement, the cell, chashama, liveart.dk, Performer Stammtisch, University of Kentucky, and shown at Defibrillator Performance Art Gallery and High Concept Laboratories (Chicago), Contemporary Art Institute of Detroit, The White Page (Minneapolis), ISSUE: Project Room, Grace Exhibition Space,  Flux Factory, English Kills, Momenta Art (NYC), Villa Victoria (Boston), La Casa del Popolo (Montreal), Gruentaler9 (Berlin) and many other spaces, in addition to public sites including a bowling alley, public libraries, bars, gas stations, etc. Outside of PPL, Brian McCorkle is a founder of composer ensemble Varispeed and has performed in PERFORMA 11 and 13, at The Guggenheim Museum, The Whitney Museum, The Kitchen, and all over the world as a performer and composer. Esther Neff (almost always operating as “PPL”) practices contextual and conceptual work involving modes of institutional critique, curation-as-art, and social performance. She also writes about performance theory and has spoken on/at GritTV, Abrons Arts Center, CUNY, The New School, and published texts here and there on the outmost fringes of academia. Brian and Esther have been collaborators since 2004. www.panoplylab.org

We (Esther Neff and Brian McCorkle) are recently returned to US soil after a harrowing durational airport performance in which we waited in line for 3 days and complained with the other people also waiting. This performance happened in addition to more specifically framed-as-art and scheduled performances in Berlin, Copenhagen, and Dortmund.

First, Teena Lange had us at Grüntaler9‎ for 4 days as part of her durational series “The Image or the Act?”  as part of MPA-B. Esther, Brian, Valerie Kuehne, and Ivy Castellanos performed 9am-9pm, operating a diner called You’re a Big Boy Now *OR* Rauschenberg Ist Tödlich, during which participants could order food (including cast chocolate body parts made by Ivy, burgers, eggs over easy, and various specials of the day), and actions/interactions involving psychoanalysis, plaster heads containing ketchup, more ketchup and mustard, food coloring, paper plates, and instruments of torture and noise including cello, meat grinders, electronic sound, keyboard, and piano horn. Video to come…

Ivy Castellanos, Hector Canonge, and Guru Rugu (Adam Overton) performed solos on three of the evenings as curated by PPL:

We also performed at the MPA-B Open, Loophole, and had some meetings about BIPAF…PPL then took a ferry ride across the Baltic Sea to be a part of Hitparaden at the Pumpehuset, where we met some fascinating folks and threw kroner into the river.  HERE IS A VIDEO OF THAT PEFORMANCE: https://vimeo.com/67509267.

Back in Berlin, we participated in (CON)TEMPORARY SPACE-TIME  at AquaBit, performing solos…

We also talked to Verb Frau (a.k.a Margaret Dragu) on camera: https://vimeo.com/66716181…Then we took the bus to Dortmund to perform at the Shauspeilhaus as part of SMALL BEAST:

Then we went back to Berlin for more (CON)TEMPORARY SPACE-TIME at Leibig12:

IV Soldiers in 2011

IV Soldiers in 2011

While the commercial art world struggles to fit the performance practices of artists today into existing market models and performance artists struggle to fit their practices into existing market models and/or to resist existing market models, Ivy Castellanos, director and curator of IV Soldiers Gallery has come a long way in the past two years her storefront gallery has been open on Noll Street towards developing new modes for the presentation of Performance Art.

Slash and Burn is characteristic of Castellanos’ curatorial methodology, involving artists in a sequence of Thursday night performances and inviting them to create new performances following an action-based directive. In this case, artists have been encouraged to “resist resistance, succumb to violent impulse, insist, enforce, make space,” a directive that Castellanos identifies as a “representative aesthetic” of the gallery, drawing on her own military background and interest in the conflux between performance art and social justice. The action-based directive, the opportunity to work on a performance with a public audience over the course of three nights, and the presentation of the work in a visual arts context all provide a concrete platform for realizing performance art

IV Soldiers in 2012, 'Transformation' performance in progress

IV Soldiers in 2012, ‘Transformation’ performance in progress

blog3as a discipline. Past exhibitions at IV Soldiers have similarly provided a conceptual directive, from ‘to campaign, to advocate” for Campaign, the gallery’s inaugural exhibition, through public can collecting and social projects during iCan in October 2012, through ‘to collaboratively and improvisationally build a conceptual treehouse, to use a site, to perform using each other’ for Transformations in November, 2012.

For SLASH AND BURN: Performance Art, each night will present the performance work of Lindsey Drury, Hiroshi Shafer, Valerie Kuehne, and PPL (Esther Neff and Brian McCorkle). Performance exhibition nights are free and open to the public.

slashandburn

SLASH AND BURN: Performance Art

Thursdays, January 17, 24, and 31
 8pm-10pm 

IV Soldiers Gallery
184 Noll Street
Bushwick, Brooklyn

valerie

Valerie Kuehne

Ivy Castellanos at MANA Contemporary in Chicago, on tour with PPL and Valerie Kuehne

Ivy Castellanos

lindsey

Lindsey Drury

hiroshi

Hiroshi Shafer at IV Soldiers

We can start over any damned time we want to. This seems as good a time as any to declare this world “new,” a slow-motion big bust passed and a new magnetism pulling matter together in ways that would have previously seemed absurd, or even impossible. There is a new odor in the air, be it the roasting of our skin cells as the sun rips through the ozone or the oozing perfume of carnivorous blooms as the foliage rapidly mutates, we keep sniffing it up like 6th graders in the craft supply closet.

Miao Jiaxin performs at PPL, 2012

Miao Jiaxin performs at PPL, 2012

PPL certainly has a new sense of itself, with a new space (Panoply Performance Laboratory, 104 Meserole Street) in which to host projects like Matthew Silver‘s monthly “Performance Art Open Mic,” (first Sunday of every month), PERFORMANCY FORUM, and the work of artists we find particularly rigorous, revelatory, and rich in substance, such as Chloë Bass‘ One-on-One Consultations for her The Bureau of Self Recognition (August 2012), a one-night exhibition with visiting artists from London’s ]performance s p a c e [Valerie Kuehne‘s curation and cognition of “performance music,” Miles Pflanz‘ book burning video-making, rehearsals for a piece by Yelena Gluzman, etc, etc, etc.

PPL bookshelf

spacespacespacespace

The space, however, has only been one aspect of condensing and strengthening of an identifiable community, individuals diverse in practice yet singularly dedicated to mutualism, collaboration, non-homegenizing collectivity, shifting points of leadership, and methodological rigor in the curation, conceptualization, and creation of live, situational, social, and performance art. It doesn’t need to be controlled, it’s impossible to frame with any kind of “art historical movement” kind of insufferable pretense, it simply occurs, dare we say “naturally,” though a fetish for “naturalness” is quite certainly a false faith.

Screen shot 2012-08-03 at 1.09.20 PM

PPL’s ‘NATURE FETISH: A public opera’ in Art Review

As organically as shifts in tectonic plates however, IV Soldiers Gallery, directed and curated by Ivy Castellanos became a site for PPL’s core exploits this past year, during the iCan Exhibition and Social Project, and during the several month-long exhibitions that have radically reformed the way we work by allowing us to consistently perform short-form pieces in stimulating contexts.

participants play analog can instruments during one of PPL's  iCan exhibition performances at IV Soldiers

participants play analog can instruments during one of PPL’s iCan exhibition performances at IV Soldiers

Our practices have similarly been forcibly evolved by collaboration with Valerie Kuehne as PPL went on a tour across the Midwestern US, collaborating improvisationally with Kuehne and those present in bars, a bowling alley, a public library, at the MDW Art Fair, etc, developing modes for combining sonic art/music and object/body-based performance, improvising, and disseminating performance art using musician/band touring models. This national tour built on our experiences with Kuehne and Anya Liftig in May 2012, when we traveled to Berlin to participate in MPA-B, working reactively within dolanbay’s action installation at Grüntaler 9, participating in Performer Stammtisch, collaborating with Liftig, and doing workshops with Lioba Reckfort and the Intergalaktische Kulturverein. All of these cretaceous experiments multiply and mutate, appearing as (as a culmination of the US tour) a 12-hour “diner/opera” called You’re a Big Boy Now OR Rauschenberg ist Todlich 

You're A Big Boy Now OR Rauschenberg ist Todlich (photo by Sissie Strutt)

You’re A Big Boy Now OR Rauschenberg ist Todlich (photo by Sissie Strutt)

performed with Kuehne at Fitness Center for Arts and Tactics (the new gallery opened by Pflanz and cohort that pulled 14 artists/groups into an epic 14-day exhibition of “marathon” durational and relational performances), conceptions of performance as involving the acts of curation and organization that surround the public presentations themselves, and the initiating of The Compendium, a temporary collaboration between organizer-artists who produced Technics, a two-night exhibition dealing with technology/technique at Center for Performance Research in June 2012, and now a new unnamed but much larger group that is instigating the online and networked participatory, mass performance/festival Brooklyn International Performance Art Festival (BIPAF), which will culminate July 4-28, 2013.

Other events have seemed to effect PPL as shifts in weather, for example the projects involving PPL co-directors Brian McCorkle and Esther Neff outside of PPL, such as Brian’s work as part of Varispeed, the collective, which produced John Cage’s Empty Words as a sprawling opus spanning Roulette, Exapno, the Brooklyn Bridge, and 12 hours of sound, text, and music. More recently, Esther has become part of the No Wave Performance Task Force, instigated by Lindsey Drury (for whom Esther created a text/sound score for the dance Run Little Girl at Merce Cunningham Studios in February 2012 and with whom PPL are collaborating to create Any Size Mirror is a Dictator, our 2013 opera) and made concrete via collaborative, feminist-form durational performances (Transformation and Embody Explosion organized by Ivy Castellanos), and other events and meetings.

'PPL Help the Water' at the Gowanus Ballroom during 'To the Stars on the Wings of an Eel'

‘PPL Help the Water’ at the Gowanus Ballroom during ‘To the Stars on the Wings of an Eel’

The more chaotic the environment/situation, the more performance thrives as a way of experiencing existence; states of becoming, recognizing, cognizing, relating, and communicating compose the now, and there is no ideal or eventual position of stability expected or even desired…ideas, spaces, organizations and other collectives, books, all the individuals with whom we’ve collaborated this past year, been curated by, curated/hosted, organized alongside, met with, all combine to construct a relational ecosystem too complex and fragile to parse, too specific to identify as any version of the world we’ve seen before…

PPL YEAR IN REVIEW THROUGH PICTURES…

DEAR COMMUNITY: we are most grateful to even be able to begin a note like this, addressing a body of individuals whose work and ideas are our daily bread.

THANK YOU to our collaborators and colleagues for having conversations with us, hosting us in your studios, spaces, and galleries, for planning and scheming with us,  for driving, for bringing coffee, for always sharing the beer, for helping haul things, for breaking various walls (literally and figuratively), for organizing talks, for attending our shows. THANK YOU for making your work, it’s impossible to quantify the influence and encouragement your practices engender THANK YOU for pursuing your obsessions to the point of madness, for working long hours, for keeping on keeping on, for spending your own money on equipment, props, travel, etc, for re-arranging your schedule, for sharing your skills and resources, for working that awful day job so you can write/compose/paint/build/practice/plan at night, for following through on your ideas, for writing down what you think, for sharing what you feel, thank you for performing even when you’re sick or exhausted or when there are only a few people in attendance, thank you for the long long long long rehearsals and dedication to your craft, thank you for not becoming a banker, a car wash attendant, a graphic designer, or a software developer. THANK YOU for for listening/watching/participating, and for giving us an opportunity to do the same: we are your rapt audience. THANK YOU. Thank You.

Finally, after that little bit of sentiment on a plate, fresh as shit out of the oven as if we are contestants on top chef canada, we will now update the pudding out of you:

PPL is an umbrella for when the snow turns to sleet. As such, Valerie Kuehne, Esther Neff, and Brian McCorkle have been performing together across the midwest, enjoying the improvisational frameworks provided by situations at a public library, warehouse, bar, house, gallery, bowling alley, etc. Thanks to Anya Liftig and Ivy Castellanos for joining us in Chicago for MDW and at the glorious Defibrillator Performance Art Gallery. Now we’re back in Brooklyn at PPL on Meserole Street. Valerie’s about to release a new album and hit the road with Joey Molinaro (stay tuned) while Brian and Esther prepare for various upcoming NYC performances.

This Sunday, November 25, join us at Muchmore’s for Performance Heart, curated by Matthew Silver: an eclectic line-up of “handbags” including Mr. Silver, Sylva Dean and Me, Lorene Bouboushian, Geraldo Mercado, Elinor Thompson, Katie Donut and Jacquelyn Gallo.

In December Brian and Esther join forces again with Valerie Kuehne to perform at the brand-new Fitness Center for Arts and Tactics as part of their “marathon performances” series. The list of dates and artists comprising this series at Fitness is:

Dec. 10th – Panoply Performance Laboratory (PPL)
Dec. 11th – BabySkinGlove
Dec. 12th – Elinor Thompson
Dec. 13th – Ivy Castellanos
Dec. 14th – Reece Cox
Dec. 15th – Hilary Sand
Dec. 16th – Sindy Butz
Dec. 17th – Whitney Hunter
Dec. 18th – Alaina Stamatis
Dec. 19th – Adjua Greaves
Dec. 20th – Matthew Silver
Dec. 21st – Amber Lee
Dec. 22nd – Sasha Desree
Dec. 23rd – Frank Ludovico

Now that’s curation. Best bet for more information about these artists and projects is to google them or find them on some social network, or just show up sometime between 1pm and 1am on any of these days to see what’s going on, just so you have something to tell your grandkids about. As you can see above, we perform Monday the 10th. We will be doing a 12 hour aleatoric opera called You’re a Big Boy Now or Rauschenberg is Tödlich. Open to the public from 1pm-1am. Click here to visit the Facebook event and see the menu, click on the title above to read more about the project.

Fitness Center for Arts and Tactics is at 1196 Myrtle Ave, Brooklyn, New York 11221, right across from Little Skips and Microscope Gallery.

 

AUGUST 3, 8:00pm-AUGUST 4, 8:00amhttp://panoplylab.org/www.varispeedcollective.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/emptywordsbanner.png

Empty Words Written by John Cage, Arranged and performed by Varispeed

8 PM – 10:30 PM: Part I: Roulette, 509 Atlantic Avenue

11 PM – 4:30 AM: Parts II & III: Exapno, 33 Flatbush Avenue, 5th floor

5 AM – 7:30 AM: Parts IV: Procession from Borough Hall over the Brooklyn Bridge

All parts of the performance are free and open to the public.

This overnight realization on Cage’s centennial is a meditation on the voice’s power to transform language into music. Varispeed’s new arrangement will lead audiences on a 12-hour journey of sound, from an ensemble of electronically manipulated and mutated song in the concert hall of Roulette to the noise of naked voices on the Brooklyn Bridge at dawn.

Written in the early 70s, Empty Words stands as an epic culmination of Cage’s exploration of the “demilitarization” of syntax and the voice’s power to evacuate meaning and create music. Using Thoreau’s journals as his source text, Cage employed chance procedures to remove all syntax from the original, creating four separate movements through which the level of textual abstraction grows.

Part One (utilizing phrases, words, syllables, and letters) begins in the concert space of Roulette, employing multiple performers and theatrics to employ the musical extremes of language. The performance then moves to the new music community space Exapno, where Varispeed transform Part Two’s words, syllables, and letters into new spatial arrangements. Peppered with food (and perhaps a nap), Part Three scatters syllables and letters around the building in a performance that is both a participatory scavenger hunt and a solo lecture. In conclusion, listeners will become performers on a communal sound walk through Downtown Brooklyn across the Brooklyn Bridge at sunrise, vocalizing the letters of Part Four in equal partnership with the surrounding urban “silence.”

Varispeed’s premiere performance of Robert Ashley’s Perfect Lives Manhattan was listed on Time Out New York’s Best of 2011 list and received praise in the New York Times and Los Angeles Times. Varispeed has worked to discover new inroads into contemporary vocal music and opera in creating site-specific, sometimes-participatory, oftentimes-durational, forevermore-experimental events. As individuals, they are all multi-faceted performers, composers, songwriters, and thinkers who collaborate in ensembles such as thingNY, Panoply Performance Laboratory, and Cough Button. (text from the Facebook event)

Don’t miss this ephemeral epic. Varispeed is (from left to right in image above) Gelsey Bell, Paul Pinto, Aliza Simons, Dave Ruder, Brian McCorkle, and the ghost of John Cage…

IV Soldiers
184 Noll St
Bushwick

iCan website

Conceived and lead by Ivy Castellanos, collectively curated and organized by the involved artists: Chloe BassIvy CastellanosQuinn DukesMiao JiaxinAnya LiftigGeraldo MercadoPanoply Performance Laboratory (Brian McCorkle and Esther Neff), Itzy Ramirez,Hiroshi Shafer, and Matthew Silver.

Enacted in 1982, the New York State Returnable Container Law hoped to encourage recycling by giving back a rebate of 5c per aluminum beer or soda can. Performance artists have long been adept at recycling trash to make work, relying on the “readymades,” furniture, lumber, clothing, and even food that others discard. Similarly, many political theorists relegate art as a whole into a “sphere of excess,” lumping art-making in with leisure-time activities such as getting drunk, shopping for pleasure, and going to nightclubs. Can art be a part of daily life? Can it be a profession? Is it worth anything? Are artists useless members of society? The iCan exhibition roots through the garbage for practical responses to these questions.

The act of collecting cans becomes a collaborative social performance and an attempt at survival as 11 artists, lead by curator-project organizer Ivy Castellanos, use the returnable container laws to raise artist fees, gallery space and studio rental, transportation costs, and more. As cans accumulate in the gallery space IV Soldiers, filling up the front window, artists will make performances in and with the cans each Thursday night in September.

For the months of July, August and September, the artists will also collect cans on the street and through several performance spaces, in conjunction with public project participants. The rebate from the cans will fund the exhibition as it is going on, creating a sustainable cycle of performance, product, and purpose. The exhibition is part of an overarching self-sustainability initiative, during which the artists will work together to make their practices economically self-sustainable.

Anyone can bring 12oz. aluminum cans to IV Soldiers Gallery Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday 7-9pm through August or by appointment (ivsoldiers@gmail.com). Performances will take place in and using the cans on the Thursday nights in September at IV Soldiers. Cans will also be collected at Panoply Performance Laboratory (104 Meserole St. Brooklyn) throughout August and at Grace Exhibition Space in July.

iCan offers an aluminum structure for self-sustainability. 

Aug. 1 – can collecting at IV Soldiers Gallery and Panoply Performance Laboratory,

Aug.  30–Opening ofiCan exhibition at IV Soldiers Gallery, Exhibition Performances 8pm-11pm

Thursdays, Sept.  6, 13, 20– Exhibition Performances, 8pm-11pm

Sept.  27 – Closing at IV Soldiers and can bagging, 8pm-9pm


PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE:


Aug 30:
Opening reception and performances at IV Soldiers – Matthew Silver, Panoply Performance Laboratory (Brian McCorkle and Esther Neff), Geraldo Mercado, and Ivy Castellanos

Sept 6:
Performances at IV Soldiers – Hiroshi Shafer, Itzy Ramirez, and Anya Liftig

Sept 13:
A traveling performance between 3 spaces. The performance will begin at 8pm at IV Soldiers with Panoply Lab, Miao Jiaxin and Matthew Silver.
Sept 20:Durational Performances at IV Soldiers – Quinn Dukes, and Chloe Bass.
*********

Panoply Performance Laboratory (PPL) and Grace Exhibition Space Present:

NATURE FETISH

A Public Opera and Performance Exhibition

Thursday July 12, Friday July 13, Thursday July 19, and Friday July 20

8pm: NATURE FETISH: A Public Opera
9:30-11pm: NATURE FETISH Exhibition performances

Saturday July 14 and Saturday, July 21
4pm and 8pm:
 NATURE FETISH: A Public Opera
9:30-11pm: NATURE FETISH Exhibition performances

Grace Exhibition Space
840 Broadway, Floor 2
Brooklyn, NY, 11206
J/M/Z to Flushing Avenue
Tickets for the July shows including the performances as part of the exhibition after the opera are a suggested donation of $10-$20 at the door only.
http://grace-exhibition-space.com/

Press Photos, Trailers:
http://www.panoplylab.org/nature.html andhttp://www.naturefetish.wordpress.com

NATURE FETISH is a project conceived across social and disciplinary spheres. In its final state, it is a Public Opera, a hybrid, documentary, participatory, musical, situational performance of approximately 70 minutes.
The opera will be presented by New York City’s first and only dedicated site for conceptual, body-based and fluxist performance art, Grace Exhibition Space. As part of each performance, PPL-curated artists working in time-based performance across disciplines will deal directly with the “nature” of performance, operation of “nature” in performance, and conceptions of “nature” as such.

Thursday July 12:
The Call of Nature: bodily functions and fluids, embodiment, waste, want, meat, and human impact on natural environments. FEATURING: Elinor Thompson, Miles PflanzDave RuderMatthew Silver, and Lorene Bouboushian.

Friday July 13:
NATURE FETISH opera project collaborating artists, poets, composers, and performers show solo works dealing with their own projections of “the nature of nature.” FEATURING: Jessica BathurstCory BrackenBrian McCorkleEllen O’MearaEsther NeffMichael NewtonNatasha MissickKatie JohnstonArla BermanMatthew Gantt and others

Saturday July 14:

SIMULTANEOUS: Nature Fetish Edition: Ivy Castellanos of IV Soldiers Galleryworks with 4 performance artists simultaneously as an ecosystem or food chain or other emergent system. FEATURING: Felix Morelo, Ryan Hawk, Matthew Silver, and Miles Pflanz.

Thursday July 19:
The Natural Spirit: field recordings, indeterminacy, fluxus, improvisation and the influence of performance art’s “nature” on music and dance. FEATURING:Jason AnastasoffLindsey Drury, and Kyli Klevan.

Friday July 20:
Rituals and Totems: cultural semiology, feminism, naturalism, post-humanism, and the problematics of performance and anthropology. FEATURING: Lillie D’ArmonAnya Liftig, Kikuko Tanaka, and Quinn Dukes.

Saturday, July 21:
Video, Voice and the Nature of the Self: FEATURING: Alessandra Eramo (w/ David Grollman), Heather Warren Crow, Valerie Kuehne/Tuba?No Tuba and Joseph Keckler.

Thank you to the artists who participated in the two days of performance and the round-table during Compendium: Technics!

For Friday, the no-tech night, thank you to Alejandro Acierto, who built a web in the performance space all day with Compendium curator Paul Pinto, then made a complex labyrinth of white fabric tape on the ground. Thank you to Emily Wexler, who rubbed her hair in construction dirt at the end of the street, rolled on the sidewalk back and forth, pounded her chest as the rain began to fall, and was doused by 5-gallon buckets of water and two buckets of mud and water by Compendium curator/CPR techmeister Thomas Bell. Thank you the audience members who came on time and got to see this, and got wet in the process. Thank you to Ivy Castellanos, who undressed and had us draw marker circles around her “blemishes” then put herself in a black plastic trash bag and became another animal. Thank you to Lindsey Drury, who tried hard to erase her equilibrium and throw up, spinning around for 20 minutes, drinking salad dressing, jumping, and did not succeed. Thank you to Rafael Sanchez, whose piece about Ghazala Javed’s murder was interrupted by fire trucks, police cars, and an ambulance, all pulling up to deal with this performance, and thank you to Rafael for saying “can’t a man grind a brick to dust using his hands in peace?” and the fireman’s response: “good luck with that,” and thank you to that neighbor kid across the street who had been watching and shouted “IT’S PERFORMANCE ART!” as a balloon carrying fragments of the brick disappeared up into the white sky. Thank you to Sister Sylvester, the entire team, who presented an excerpt from a new work-in-progress drawing on Moby Dick and many other sources involving a live goldfish, small models of the larger set pieces in a terrarium, and a lobster claw cooking mitt, among other items of speech, action, and object. Thank you to Hiroshi Shafer for making a piece using music box guts attached to tin and plastic plates and a hand-drawn (by Derick Wycherly) series of story boards. Thank to Matthew Silver for telling us the story, it made us laugh hysterically. Thank you to Charmaine’s Names for performing an un-amplified version of their post-modern Philadelphia experimental lounge glory without microphones, without lights, and thank you to Toby Driver (and 2nd clarinetist? lost the name…) for performing virtuosically, of course still without any technical assistance whatsoever, and concluding a day of intensity and intimacy.

The video documentation of the 2nd “full tech” day should be posted by CPR soon, but in the meantime THANK YOU to the artists of June 23, including those who came to the round-table and participated in the discussion! Thank you to those who performed technical incarnations of their work (or had performed no-tech versions of these pieces the night before): Lindsey (who did throw up a little), Ivy (who got to wear her sculptural armor), Sister Sylvester (who live-fed the taking of a weather balloon out onto the street).

Thank you also to the hi-tech Saturday-only artists: Jorge Rojas taping his face over livestream, Whitney Hunter for giving a talk about two of his pieces and their use of technology, animator/video/visual artist Brian Zegeer and banjo-player Baby Copperhead for showing/performing their film/sound project Pull My Daisy, performance artist Anya Liftig and assistant Michael Newton for their cell phone communication, and thank you thank you to Robert Dick, for demonstrating the height of human technical ability, blowing our minds (glissando headjoint®!)

Finally, thank you the audience for participating in this experimental micro-conference/exhibition! Thank you to CPR, and thank you electricity!